Get Professional Citizenship and Immigration support from our experienced Attorneys.

Applying for naturalization or citizenship can be a challenging and trying process. With professional help from our lawyers, the process can be a smooth one. We will help you or your loved one make sense of the application, complete it with accuracy, submit it with confidence and prepare for your interview with poise.

Our Attorneys will provide strategic advice and compassionate support, taking the anxiety and stress out of this momentous step in your life. Let us help you with:


"Josh Nunez — This lawyer is a Hispanic source of pride who maintains the welfare of their customers through unique and professional services."

― Jeanne


Requirements for Citizenship Application

As with any immigration process in the U.S., applying for citizenship is a bit more complicated than simply checking off a few boxes. The list of basic requirements is long and, once met, are followed by a slew of paperwork and a drilling interview before a U.S. representative finally makes their discretionary decision.

Among the basic requirements are:

  • You already have a green card
  • You have not established a primary home in another country
  • You have not spent more than a year at a time outside the U.S.
  • You have “good moral character”
  • And so on

As you see, some of these requirements are black and white while others are clearly on a variable basis.

Every citizenship applicants’ situation is unique but the standards are strict and the stakes are high. One incomplete form, the omission of a critical piece of information, or a lack of proper preparation for the all-important interview can quickly extinguish your hopes for approval.


FOIA Requests

If you were not successful in obtaining permanent residency or a work visa, you might wish to request information on the reasons why it was denied. The records the U.S. immigration office retains on you are kept in your “A” file. You can obtain these records by making a request using the Freedom of Information Act (“FOIA”). You can also obtain records of another individual with that person’s consent.

As with any process through the USCIS, making an FOIA request can be far more complicated than you’d imagine. Knowing whom to make the request to, what type of information you’re looking for, and clearly defining the purpose of your request can get confusing and frustrating, especially if you need to expedite the process in preparation for an upcoming interview or hearing.

Your FOIA request can be entirely handled by our attorneys. Once we have your written consent or affidavit, we can take care of the rest. We’ve skillfully handled this process on countless occasions, and we can do the same for you.


FBI Background Checks

Performing your own background check is all about preparation. Court personnel have faults, and the system can get backlogged, so it’s entirely possible that your record has a mistake on it or something that you were expecting to be expunged. If you find this out at your interview or customs, though, it’s already too late and the damage has been done.

It is always best to conduct your own background check if you were arrested or have a conviction, even if it was expunged. It’s important to remember that expunged records and arrests must be disclosed at a visa or citizenship interview; otherwise, your application will likely be denied.

If your check reveals a prior conviction or indicates your conviction has yet to be expunged or sealed despite having a court order, contact our immigration lawyers before your visa or citizenship interview to advise you on how to proceed.


Nothing is more satisfying than securing your citizenship. Let our immigration attorneys help!